Jan. 2019 Mental Health First Aid 2-Day Course

Mental Health First Aid

Clifton Memorial Library

292Piaget Avenue, Clifton, NJ 07011

January 12th and January 19th 2019

Time:  10:00am to 2:00pm

 

 Course is for adults 18+…What you will learn:

  • How to recognize signs of mental health disorders such as anxiety, depression, psychosis and addiction
  • How to approach and support someone in a mental health crisis until appropriate professional help arrives
  • How to be supportive, diffuse the situation, and encourage professional help
  • Understand what to do if someone is suicidal, harming themselves, or refusing help

Become certified in this five-step process which includes; assessing risk, respectfully listening to and supporting an individual in crisis, and identifying appropriate professional help and other supports.

 

A commitment to attending the ENTIRE 8 hours is required. Being offered for $25

Must be a Passaic County Resident

Bagels and coffee will be provided in the morning

Working lunch – please bring your own lunch

 

For information contact: rleon@mhapassaic.org – to register, click the button below

 


MHFA Dates



 

Sponsored by

Wayne Township kicks off  STIGMA-FREE campaign !!!! 

Wayne_Stigma_Free
On Tuesday, August 28th 2018 the first meeting of the Wayne Township Task Force took place.  Representatives from the Wayne Health Department organized the meeting and invited school officials, Wayne Counseling, the Wayne Alliance, the Mental Health Association in Passaic County and Wayne resident and community activists.  The goal is to raise awareness of mental illness, provide effective ways to reduce stigma and encourage people to seek services and receive the proper support they deserve.

*October 6th & 13th Mental Health First Aid 2-Day Course (Allwood Branch Library)

Mental Health First Aid

Allwood Branch Library

44 Lyall Road, Clifton, NJ 07012

October 6th and October 13th 2018

Time: 10:00am to 2:00pm

(Click here for September Classes)

 

What you will learn…

  • How to recognize signs of mental health disorders such as anxiety, depression, psychosis and addiction
  • How to approach and support someone in a mental health crisis until appropriate professional help arrives
  • How to be supportive, diffuse the situation, and encourage professional help
  • Understand what to do if someone is suicidal, harming themselves, or refusing help

Become certified in this five-step process which includes; assessing risk, respectfully listening to and supporting an individual in crisis, and identifying appropriate professional help and other supports.

A commitment to attending the ENTIRE 8 hours is required. This course is typically $170, but being offered for $25 to residents and community leaders as part of the Clifton Stigma-Free Initiative.

*bagels and coffee will be provided in the morning
*working lunch – please bring your own lunch

For information contact: rleon@mhapassaic.org – to register, click the button: Adults 18+ Only


MHAFA Dates



*September 22nd & 29th Mental Health First Aid 2-Day Course (Clifton Memorial Library)

Mental Health First Aid

Clifton Memorial Library

292 Piaget Ave., Clifton, NJ 07011

September 22nd and September 29th 2018

Time: 10:00am to 2:00pm

(Click here for October Classes)

What you will learn…

  • How to recognize signs of mental health disorders such as anxiety, depression, psychosis and addiction
  • How to approach and support someone in a mental health crisis until appropriate professional help arrives
  • How to be supportive, diffuse the situation, and encourage professional help
  • Understand what to do if someone is suicidal, harming themselves, or refusing help

Become certified in this five-step process which includes; assessing risk, respectfully listening to and supporting an individual in crisis, and identifying appropriate professional help and other supports.

A commitment to attending the ENTIRE 8 hours is required. This course is typically $170, but being offered for $25 to residents and community leaders as part of the Clifton Stigma-Free Initiative.

*bagels and coffee will be provided in the morning
*working lunch – please bring your own lunch

For information contact: rleon@mhapassaic.org – to register, click the button: Adults 18+ Only


MHAFA Dates



STIGMA-FREE “BRIDGING THE POND” #StigmaFree

STIGMA-FREE “BRIDGING THE POND”
UK FIRST RESPONDER INSPIRED BY BERGEN COUNTY INITIATIVE

MEDIA INVITED TO ATTEND 

TWO PART PROGRAM DESIGNED TO SHARE BEST PRACTICES WHILE PROVIDING TIPS ON BUILDING RESILIENCY AND A CULTURE OF MENTAL HEALTH FOR FIRST RESPONDERS

 

NJ First Responders 20180831_8.5x11 (005)-page-001

 Friday, August 31, 2018

8:00 a.m.: FIRST RESPONDER BREAKFAST

11:00 a.m.: STIGMA-FREE ROUNDTABLE & LUNCHEON

 

NEW BRIDGE MEDICAL CENTER

Auditorium
230 East Ridgewood Avenue
Paramus, NJ 07652

To RSVP

Donnalee Corrieri at DCorrieri@NewBridgeHealth.org

(PARAMUS, NJ – July 19, 2018) – First responders and stigma-free members are invited to attend “Stigma-Free Bridging the Pond”, a two part program is being at New Bridge Medical Center in Paramus on Friday, August 31. In an effort to officially bring the Stigma-Free initiative to the United Kingdom, the day’s events will start with a First Responder Breakfast from 8 a.m.-10 a.m., and conclude with a Stigma-Free Roundtable and Luncheon from 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

This event was inspired by international visitor, Dan Farnworth. Farnworth is a Sir Winston Churchill Fellowship Winner, a member of England’s Emergency Medical Service and a leader in “Our Blue Light”, a charity organization in England and Wales that aims to improve the mental health, well-being and working life of Emergency & Essential Services including: Police, Fire, Ambulance, Search & Rescue, Prison Service and the National Health Services. After discovering the abundance of resources available through the Stigma-Free Initiative –he decided to take action to strengthen the fight against stigma across the pond by studying the Paramus Stigma-Free Zone as a “best practice” in mental health.

“The theme of the day is ‘Stigma-Free Bridging the Pond,” explained Cynthia Chazen, Mental Health Editor and producer of the NJ Stigma-Free Newsletter. “It speaks to this amazing international opportunity, but also what we are doing in our communities – creating bridges that help to connect individuals to support that they need.”

In addition to exploring the UK advocacy efforts of “Our Blue Light” with Farnworth, the First Responder Breakfast will include remarks from James J. Tedesco III, County Executive of Bergen, and leader in the Stigma-Free Initiative.

The County Executive was not only integral in bringing this initiative to Paramus five years ago,” commented Mary Ann Uzzi, Paramus Stigma-Free founder and community mental health advocate. “He also committed to making all of Bergen County a stigma-free zone, and we have seen the effect of that promise. Without his support and passionate advocacy, the ripples of our efforts never would have made it across the pond!”

The morning will also feature an overview of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy, offered by Dr. Maria G Masciandaro, PsyD. Maria is a psychologist who specializes in the effects of trauma, and works with the Trauma Recovery Humanitarian Association Program to train therapists who help first responders across the country. EMDR utilizes protocols geared for individuals or groups these specialized clinicians help to build resilience and foster post traumatic growth.

 

The second part of the day features a luncheon with roundtable discussions, meant for stigma-free leaders to come together to share their ideas, successes and challenges that they have faced in bringing the Stigma-Free Initiative to fruition. The purpose of this portion of the day is to brainstorm and provide insight on the best way to implement the initiative in the United Kingdom.

“We are thrilled to have Dan travel from the UK to share best practices,” said Uzzi. “We thank Care Plus NJ, Inc., and New Bridge Medical Center, both resources have been instrumental in the Stigma-Free Initiate since inception and continue to support us through events like this and so much more.”

 

This forum is sponsored by the Paramus Stigma-Free Task Force, in collaboration with New Bridge Medical Center and Care Plus NJ, Inc., also in celebration of the five year anniversary of the Paramus Stigma-Free Zone.

Organizations and individuals who are interested attending the event can contact Donnalee Corrieri at DCorrieri@NewBridgeHealth.org for more information and to register.

 

For press information contact:

Donnalee Corrieri 201.225.7141 dcorrieri@newbridgehealth.org

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New Jersey’s Rate of Depression

More than 57,000 New Jersey residents suffer from long-lasting feelings of hopelessness and helplessness — a diagnosis known as major depression — and women are more than twice as likely as men to feel that way, according to the state’s largest insurer.

Claims made to Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey show that 3.5 percent of the privately insured population below age 65 has been diagnosed with the psychological condition, compared to 4.4 percent nationally.

“We know this is true,” said Debra Wentz, president and CEO of the New Jersey Association of Mental Health and Addiction Agencies. “Depression is the single strongest risk factor for suicidal behavior.”

Although progress has been made in treating depression with medication and psychotherapy, she said, most people diagnosed “remain untreated or experience significant delays” in receiving treatment.

Successfully treating depression and other behavioral health problems is as important as managing chronic medical conditions like diabetes or heart disease, Horizon’s director of behavioral health solutions, Suzanne Kunis, said. “It is also directly linked to a person’s overall health.”

In New Jersey, major events such as the 9/11 attacks, Superstorm Sandy and the 2008 recession all had an impact on residents’ mental health, Wentz said. Seeking care for depression has been “normalized,” she said, and some of the stigma and discrimination experienced by patients in the past has receded. But there is a shortage of mental-health professionals, she added.

Only hypertension has a greater impact on Americans’ health, the national Blue Cross Blue Shield Association said, estimating that 9 million commercially insured people nationwide suffer from major depression.

Everyone feels sad or blue at some point, but major depression refers to a loss of interest in normal activities or relationships every day for at least two weeks. Some people may experience this once in their lives, while for others it is a recurring condition.

For women, post-partum depression may occur after the birth of a baby. Others experience seasonal depressions. Undiagnosed depression among the elderly is a big concern.

Diagnoses have been increasing for all age groups, but are rising fastest for adolescents and millenials, the national report said.  New Jersey data on different age groups were not available.

(This article originally appeared in north jersey.com click here for the full post and more statistics)

Lindy Washburn for the Bergen Record, May 11, 2018

Suicide Hotline Bill Passed in Congress

What’s Up with Congress?

This week the House of Representative passed H.R. 2345, the Suicide Prevention Hotline Improvement Act, which establishes that the Federal Communications Commission may study the steps it would take to create a 3-digit suicide prevention hotline and evaluate the effectiveness of the current hotline for suicide prevention (1-800-273-TALK) including how well it helps veterans. The Senate passed its own identical bill in November 2017, which means the bill heads now to the president for signature to become law. In the Senate, consideration of an opioid response package is still under consideration.

The Senate passed a companion bill in November 2017, sponsored by Utah Republican Orrin G. Hatch.

“There are literally lives on the line here and leaving them on hold is not an option,” said Hatch in June, calling on the House to move quickly on their version of the bill.

Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S., according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. In Stewart and Hatch’s home state of Utah, young people are particularly vulnerable, and suicide is the leading cause of death among teens.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline provides free and confidential emotional support to people in suicidal crisis or emotional distress. The program was last authorized at $7.2 million a year through fiscal year 2021.

MHA continues its advocacy efforts pushing Congress to pass opioid response legislation and funding. MHA has also ramped up efforts in response to the Administration’s continued degradation of the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid expansion. As American individuals and families face access and affordability challenges in the health care market, MHA strongly believes the Administration should protect comprehensive health plans that cover mental health and substance use benefits.

(source)

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Awareness Month July: Minority Mental Health

MentalHealthAwarenessMonth2018_FINAL

National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month

Did you know that July is Minority Mental Health Awareness Month?

While the term ‘minority’ is traditionally associated with racial, ethnic, or cultural minorities, Mental Health America (MHA) and its affiliates, like the Mental Health Association in Passaic County is focused on expanding this term to include individuals from a wide-range of marginalized and underserved communities. This includes the LGBTQ+ spectrum, refugee and immigrant groups, religious groups, and others who are often overlooked.

By making this term more inclusive, we are broadening our way of thinking and underscoring the need to address mental health issues with a unique lens while integrating the varied needs of diverse communities.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA):

  • Over 70% of Black/African American adolescents with a major depressive episode did not receive treatment for their condition.
  • Almost 25% of adolescents with a major depressive episode in the last year were Hispanic/Latino.
  • Asian American adults were less likely to use mental health services than any other racial/ethnic groups.
  • In the past year, nearly 1 in 10 American Indian or Alaska Native young adults had serious thoughts of suicide.
  • In the past year, 1 in 7 Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander adults had a diagnosable mental illness.

Several large-scale studies have also shown *

  • Higher rates of major depression, generalized anxiety disorder and substance use or dependence in lesbian and gay youth.
  • Higher rates of recurrent major depression among gay men.
  • Higher rates of anxiety, mood and substance use disorders, and suicidal thoughts among people ages 15 to 54 with same-sex partners.
  • Higher use of mental health services in men and women reporting same-sex partners.

 

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning (LGBTQ) community faces mental health conditions just like the rest of the population community experiences more negative mental health outcomes due to prejudice, harassment, discrimination and family rejection. Finding mental health providers that are inclusive and sensitive to these issues is a real challenge.

Here is some information from the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)

Here are some ideas to help locate an LQBTQ-inclusive provider:


Tips For Talking To Your Provider

  • If you feel comfortable, come out when you meet with your provider.
  • Ask questions about the provider’s experience working with LGBTQ people.
  • Be confident about disclosing relevant information about your sexual orientation and/or gender identity.
  • Be open about your thoughts and feelings of depression, suicide, anxiety, fear and self-harm.
  • Ask for more information about any health-care-related referrals, including to other therapists and psychiatrists.


Support & Resources

If you are experiencing a mental health condition, it’s possible to take control of your health care and improve your chance of recovery. There are a number of resources available:

 

* Several large population-based public health studies are discussed in the November American Psychologist (Vol. 56, No. 11) by Susan Cochran, PhD, an epidemiologist in the University of California, Los Angeles